China Lights

Band of Delinquents

Using the word “delinquents” to describe the characters in these films might be far too lenient. The binding threads are the depiction of kids united in a group, and that each film is a significant achievement in its own right.

The Tribe (2014) is directed by Myroslav Slaboshpytskiy. A new student arrives at a school for the deaf in the Ukraine, and must endure his harsh initiation into the group. All of the actors use sign language, and are in fact deaf. The entire film is shot without any spoken dialogue, or with the use of any subtitles. The Tribe is raw and effectively affecting.

Kids (1995)

Kids (1995)


Kids
(1995) is directed by Larry Clark. Nashville’s Harmony Korine wrote the script for his debut into the professional world of filmmaking. Kids often feels like a documentary, or an early reality show. Its matter-of-fact style showcases the dregs of teenage humanity, leaving the viewer with uneasy thoughts for judgment and contemplation.

A Clockwork Orange (1971)

A Clockwork Orange (1971)


A Clockwork Orange
(1971) is directed by Stanley Kubrick. Within a surreal backdrop, a band of delinquent youth practices its interpretation of “ultra-violence.” Kubrick withholds nothing, and also allows for the judgment of society and its failings in rehabilitation. A Clockwork Orange is a triumphant masterpiece.

Los Olvidados (1950)

Los Olvidados (1950)


Los Olvidados
(1950) is directed by Luis Buñuel, who focuses his attention on the desperation of the poverty-stricken. The kids are faced with unethical alliances and trying to survive in the unforgiving streets. Los Olvidados was produced in Buñuel’s Mexican period, in which he did a lot of really fine work.

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About the Author

Norbert made Murfreesboro, Tenn., his home in 1997. He conceived the Living Room Cinema column in 2006, and submits them regularly to the Murfreesboro Pulse. Aside from his love of films, Norbert is also an avid photographer. He is the very proud father of two, he beats on an old guitar, and plays a dicey game of Chess at best. Like Living Room Cinema at facebook.com/livingroomcinema.

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